Osram and Philips bare projector bulb code description

Posted by John Reilly on 10/31/2013 to Projector Lamp Specifications
If you have a projector than you are using a projector lamp module. Inside that module is an Osram or Philips bulb. The bulbs made by these companies are generally considered "original" bulbs. Sometimes that word is tossed around a lot to convince people they are buying a genuine original lamp module when they are not. The bulb itself is only one component of the lamp module.
 
Some companies will sell you the bare bulb alone and make you think that replacing it is a simple task. In most cases it is not and the cost is only marginally better than buying the factory assembled module. Allprojectorlamps.com has almost any bulb, so if you want to try a bare bulb, please give us a call at 866-470-9877.
 
OK, Here is the breakdown of the lamp code and how you know if you are getting a real original bulb (not module). For examples we will use the following bulb codes:
  • UHP 180-150 1.0 P22
  • P-VIP 300/1.3 E22.5
Philips projector bulbs all start with UHP which stands for "Ultra High Performance". Osram projector bulbs all start with P-VIP which means "Professional Video Projection".
 
Following these codes are numbers signifying the wattage or wattage range, reflector type and size etc. If you have a bare bulb in your projector module that has a code that begins with either of these part numbers, than you can be assured that you have an original bulb (not module). Another similar code USH is for a Ushio projector bulb. Ushio is also an original projector bulb manufacturer and is used in many Mitsubishi projectors.
 
The numbers after the first few letters describe the watts or wattage range. For example a Philips UHP 180-150 means that the bulb produces 150 to 180 watts depending on the module where it is used. This bulb can be used in several distinctly different projector lamp modules. The lamp modules is part or the projector light systems and requires a power supply and ballast to work. The ballast is designed to operate the lamp at a very specific wattage. If your projector is designed to operate with the lamp at 150W, you cannot get it to work at a higher wattage even if the lamp has the ability to work at the higher wattage.
 
The next number 1.0 or 1.3 is the arc gap between the electrodes in the arc tube. If you looked inside the reflector of a projector bulb, you will see the arc tube protruding from the center of the reflector. Inside that arc tube is the actual light source. There are 2 electrodes pointing at each other and when the lamp is ignited, light is produced when a electrical current jumps the gap and produces an arc between electrodes. Using a volt ohm meter will not tell you if your projector lamp is defective as there is no complete circuit. You cannot "test" these lamps without using the proper ballast and power supply.
 
The last number P22 or P22.5 is the shape and size of the projector bulb. The "P" means that it is a Parabolic shape (kind of square), and the "E" means Elliptical (or round). The number after that will be the diameter of the bulb. In these they are 22 and 22.5 mm. Most of these lamps range in size from 19.8 to 23 mm in size.
 
At AllProjectorlamps.com we can supply any projector lamp, including the bare bulb. If you do not see it listed on our website, just give us a call at 866-4170-9877.